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Providing Clinical Services to Children and Families of Color
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This presentation will provide information about the lives of one racial group as an example of the approach to learning about persons with whom one may have limited contact. The group is African Americans. In the United States, the media is often the mechanism for learning about “the other”.

9/19/2015
When: 9/19/2015
9:00 AM
Where: First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley
Geneva Hall, 1st Floor, Calvin Room 2407 Dana Street
Berkeley 94704
United States
Contact: Wright Institute Continuing Education
510.841.9230 x114

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To Register: Please Sign up by Sept 17th
http://www.wi.edu/continuing-education

Contact: Wright Institute Continuing Education
Phone: Email: Julie@wi.edu Phone: 510.841.9230 x114

Credits: 3 CE hours. The Wright Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to
sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Wright Institute maintains responsibility for this
program and its content.

Workshop Description:
This presentation will provide information about the lives of one racial group as an example of the
approach to learning about persons with whom one may have limited contact. The group is African
Americans.

In the United States, the media is often the mechanism for learning about “the other”. The goal of media is
to entertain and not educate. Therefore, this course will begin by making a distinction between the
vernacular and sustaining cultures in the African American community, placing both in historical context.
The second section will focus on moving from “at risk” to “at promise”. It will place Black children and
their families in context to encourage an examination of perceptions of and reactions to Black children.

The provision of clinical services impact the lives of patients i.e. how they think, feel and behave. In order
for the clinician to make such an investment, a belief that interventions can and will work needs to fuel the
course of treatment. This presentation places treatment in context, which may help root this hope in the
culture.

Topics will include: healthy functioning in Black families, the role of informal family networks (fictive
kin), the in locus parentis role played by Black organizations etc.
THE WRIGHT INSTITUTE AND ACPA PRESENT:

Please contact us in advance if you require special accommodations on the day of the event.

After attending this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Summarize the humanities and psychological contexts for past and current images of Black children
and adolescents
2. Recognize the sources of vernacular and sustaining cultures in the African American community
3. Seek to find and then use the mantras that are integral to sustaining the positive development of
Black children and adolescents
4. Describe how Black children are viewed in terms of child versus adult (and when that occurs) and
the impact of some Blacks being seen as subhuman

Instructor Bio:
Jessica Henderson Daniel, PhD, ABPP, is an Associate Professor of
Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and
both Director of Training in Psychology and Associate Director of the
Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) Training Program in
Adolescent Medicine, both at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is Adjunct
Associate Professor of Psychology in the Clinical Psychology Program at Boston
University.
Her career has focused on education, training and mentoring.
Under her leadership as Chair of the Massachusetts Board of Registration of
Psychologists, Massachusetts became and remains the only state to require both
instruction and training about persons of color in order to become licensed as a
psychologist.
She has received awards for education and training from the American
Psychological Association, APPIC (Association of Psychology Postdoctoral
and Internship Centers), H arvard Medical School, the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health
Centers, and the Society of Clinical Psychology. Awards for mentoring have been received from Harvard
Medical School (the first woman, first person of color and first psychologist), APAGS (American
Psychological Association of Graduate Students), APA Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic
Minority Issues, and APA Society for the Psychology of Women. After receiving the latter initial award, it
was re-named the Strickland-Daniel Award for Mentoring.
In the American Psychological Association, she is a past president of Division 35, Society for the
Psychology of Women and the first African American women to be elected to the APA Board of Directors,
having served from 2005-2007. While on the Board, she chaired the APA Presidential Task Force,
Centering on Mentoring and initiated the idea for the Task Force on Strength and Resilience in Black
Children and Adolescents. The latter produced an APA report.

Cancellation Policy:
If you have paid for a workshop and are unable to attend, please email us at julie@wi.edu with your
mailing address and we will mail you a refund check for the full amount paid. Checks will be mailed
within 30 days of notification.

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Oakland, CA 94602
(510) 433-9580

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